Each succeeding housing initiative of the coalition government has been declared a resounding success. This is their version of evidence free policy. Alas, the latest Housing Statistical Release from the Department of Communities and Local Government shows a continuing decline of ‘net supply of housing’ in England. Annual Housing supply amounted to 124,720 net additional dwellings in 2012-13, an 8% decrease from the previous year. This marks the third year in a row that the numbers have declined under the coalition government.

The net additions are determined by adding together new build homes, conversions (e.g. conversion of a house or building into flats), change of use (e.g. a shop into a house, or vice versa), demolitions and other changes to the dwelling stock. Table 1, below, shows the number of annual net additional dwellings from 2000-01 through to 2012-13. As you can see in the last year of the New Labour government 144,770 net additional dwellings were added to the stock. Each succeeding year has seen a decline in their numbers, a decrease of 13.83% on the 2009-10 figures, and a 31% drop compared to 2008-9. Compared to the last pre-crash year the decline is almost 100,000.

Table 2 shows the breakdown of the different components for 2012/13. Table 3 shows the components of net supply from 2007-8.

Although there was an increase in new builds in 2011-12, the decline last year was 9,620.

In Swindon in 2012-13 there were only 600 net additional homes. Table 3 shows net additional dwellings for Swindon between 2004-05 and last year.

At the Council meeting last Thursday, Conservative Councillor Wayne Crabbe was honest enough to say that we face a “housing crisis”. “The picture out there,” he said, referring to the housing situation, “is quite dismal”. It is so as a result of the government’s disatrous housing strategy, of which the figures below are clear evidence.

Table 1: Annual net   additional dwellings 2000-01 to 2012-13, England
Financial Year Net supply   (dwellings) % change from   previous year

2000-01

132,000

2001-02

146,700

11%

2002-03

159,870

9%

2003-04

170,970

7%

2004-05

185,550

9%

2005-06

202,260

9%

2006-07

214,940

6%

2007-08

223,530

4%

2008-09

182,770

-18%

2009-10

144,870

-21%

2010-11

137,390

-5%

2011-12

134,900

-2%

2012-13

124,720

-8%

Table 2: components   of housing supply, 2007-08 to 2012-13
Components 2007-8 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Change 2011-12 to 2012-13
New build completions

200,300

157,630

124,200

117,700

128,160

118,540

-9,620

Net conversions

9,020

8,640

6,230

5,050

5,240

4,100

-1,150

Net change of use

17,640

16,640

13,600

11,540

12,590

12,780

190

Net other gains

1,020

270

970

1,810

1,100

1,370

270

Demolitions

20,600

16,590

16,330

14,890

12,200

12,060

-140

Adjustment to   Census 2011

16,190

16,190

16,190

16,190

Net additonal   dwellings

223,550

182,770

144,870

137,390

134,900

124,720

-10,170

Swindon Net   additional dwellings from 2004-05 to 2012-13. From Table 123 DCLG Live Tables
2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13

1,770

1,610

2,330

2,010

1,030

940

840

890

600

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